The Inevitable
The Inevitable
Kevin Kelly
A New York Times Bestseller From one of our leading technology thinkers and writers, a guide through the twelve technological imperatives that will shape the next thirty years and transform our lives Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives—from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture—can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends—interacting, cognifying, flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning—and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly’s bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading—what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place—as this new world emerges. From the Hardcover edition.
In reply to David King
1y
Jason Crawford
@jasoncrawford · 1y
I have tried this and I dislike it. More comfortable to control the pace, and better to allow myself time to pause on important ideas and think
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In reply to David King
1y
Ankit Ranka
@aranka · 1y
Really tough to tell, tv and radio are dedicated devices (mostly) while Internet is consumed on a wide variety of devices and context (which includ... more
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David King
@dk · 1y
I haven't yet, but need to pick that one up. Been a huge fan of his blogs for so long. You liked?
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1y
Ryan Sapp
@ryanparkcity · 1y
What did they want to be?
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In reply to David King
1y
If you’re enjoying this book, I’m confident you’ll like it.
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1y
Kimsia Sim
@kimsia · 1y
Yes this is indeed like a manifesto for highlighter
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In reply to David King
1y
You ever read his prior book “What Technology Wants”?
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In reply to Ryan Sapp
1y
David King
@dk · 1y
Check my next highlight for exactly the answer. 🙃
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1y
Julian Weisser
@weisser · 1y
Yes! Andy’s Holloway is effectively written about in this book as well!
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In reply to Jason Crawford
1y
David King
@dk · 1y
I feel like I've seen it in brief demonstration (maybe on a website?). I don't recall liking it much, but I'm also certainly not accustomed to it. ... more
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1y
Dave Mongan
@dvm · 1y
Yes! Such a great shortcut for exchanging ideas.
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In reply to David King
1y
Ankit Ranka
@aranka · 1y
Really tough to tell, tv and radio are dedicated devices (mostly) while Internet is consumed on a wide variety of devices and context (which includ... more
Reply
The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.176
In the United States, TV still captures most of our attention, followed by radio, and then the internet.
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David King@dk · 1y
I was dumbfounded to read that radio captures more attention than the Internet! This was written in 2016. Can this possibly be true?
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In reply to Jason Crawford
1y
David King
@dk · 1y
I feel like I've seen it in brief demonstration (maybe on a website?). I don't recall liking it much, but I'm also certainly not accustomed to it. ... more
Reply
In reply to David King
1y
Jason Crawford
@jasoncrawford · 1y
I have tried this and I dislike it. More comfortable to control the pace, and better to allow myself time to pause on important ideas and think
Reply
The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.102
We'll unbundle books into their constituent bits and pieces and knit those into the web, but the higher level organization of the book will be the focus for our attention —that remaining scarcity in our economy. A book is an attention unit. A fact is interesting, an idea is important, but only a story, a good argument, a wellcrafted narrative is amazing, never to be forgotten.
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David King@dk · 1y
Unbundling and networking of books.
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The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.98
Over the next three decades, scholars and fans, aided by computational algorithms, will knit together the books of the world into a single networked literature. A reader will be able to generate a social graph of an idea, or a timeline of a concept, or a networked map of influence for any notion in the library. We'll come to understand that no work, no idea stands alone, but that all good, true, and beautiful things are ecosystems of intertwined parts and related entities, past and present.
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David King@dk · 1y
Let's build this!
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The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.92
Ebooks today lack the fungibility of the ur-text of screening: Wikipedia. But eventually the text of ebooks will be liberated in the near future, and the true nature of books will blossom.
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David King@dk · 1y
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtext_edition I'm excited for this "true nature" to emerge!
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The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.91
There is an experimental type of reading called rapid serial visual presentation, which uses a screen only one word wide. As small as a postage stamp. Your eye remains stationary, fixed on one word, which replaces itself with the next word in the text, and then the one after that. So your eye reads a sequence of words "behind” one another rather than in a long string next to one another. A small screen only one word wide can squeeze in almost anywhere, expanding the territory of where we can read.
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David King@dk · 1y
Rapid Serial Visual Presentation
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The Inevitable
The Inevitable
by Kevin Kelly
p.62
Pages and browsers are far less important. Today the prime units are flows and streams. We constantly monitor Twitter streams and the flows of posts on our Facebook wall. We stream photos, movies, and music. News banners stream across the bottom of TVs. We subscribe to YouTube streams, called channels. And RSS feeds from blogs. We are bathed in streams of notifications and updates. Our apps improve in a flow of upgrades. Tags have replaced links. We tag and “like” and “favorite” moments in the streams. Some streams, like Snapchat, Facebook Live, and Periscope, operate totally in the present, with no past or future.
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David King@dk · 1y
It's surprising to me that the flows and streams don't yet structure information to be very reusable in the future. It would seem that Twitter should be an amazing web search engine. And while I understand there is plenty of usage of search on Twitter it doesn't appear to solve general web search really well nor do they focus on how it could uniquely serve the search use case.
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