The Color of Law
The Color of Law
Richard Rothstein
In reply to Mishti Sharma
1mo
Ally Markovich
@allymarkovich · 1mo
My initial reaction is that he DOES say that civil society is at fault, but not nearly as much, no? And just b/c there's a problem with gov, doesn'... more
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The Color of Law
The Color of Law
by Richard Rothstein
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Mishti Sharma@Mishti · 1mo
From Jacobin Mag's review of the book—curious what you all think: "Rothstein is right to attack the systematic racism that has plagued this country and to lay bare the way our cities have been racially segregated — and continue to be to this day...to the extent that it helps educate the young, and especially white Americans, about certain harsh realities, The Color of Law serves a good purpose. This country’s sorry record on race needs to be aired as an essential part of our urban history. On the other hand, Rothstein is wrong in ways that mislead readers about the causes and course of racial segregation. His errors of theory and fact seriously undermine the value of the book as a work of historiography and are a disservice to progressive politics today. Indeed, Rothstein ends up bolstering conservative positions on several fronts, starting with the idea that racism is not a structural element of US civil society and that government is the problem not the solution."
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The Color of Law
The Color of Law
by Richard Rothstein
The Federal Housing Administration and Veterans Administration not only refused to insure mortgages for African Americans in designated white neighborhoods like Ladera; they also would not insure mortgages for whites in a neighborhood where African Americans were present. So once East Palo Alto was integrated, whites wanting to move into the area could no longer obtain government-insured mortgages. State-regulated insurance companies...also declared that their policy was not to issue mortgages to whites in integrated neighborhoods...The Bank of America and other leading California banks had similar policies, also with the consent of federal banking regulators.
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Mishti Sharma@Mishti · 1mo
How federal and state housing policy created a slum in East Palo Alto - where, within six years of the above, the population of East Palo Alto was 82 percent black.
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The Color of Law
The Color of Law
by Richard Rothstein
Until the last quarter of the twentieth century, racially explicit policies of federal, state, and local governments defined where whites and African Americans should live. Today’s residential segregation in the North, South, Midwest, and West is not until the last quarter of the twentieth century, racially explicit policies of federal, state, and local governments defined where whites and African Americans should live. Today’s residential segregation in the North, South, Midwest, and West is not the unintended consequence of individual choices and of otherwise well-meaning law or regulation but of unhidden public policy that explicitly segregated every metropolitan area in the United States. The policy was so systematic and forceful that its effects endure to the present time. Without our government’s purposeful imposition of racial segregation, the other causes—private prejudice, white flight, real estate steering, bank redlining, income differences, and self-segregation—still would have existed but with far less opportunity for expression.
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Mishti Sharma@Mishti · 1mo
When people think of segregation, they most often think of factors like private prejudice, white flight, real estate steering, bank redlining, income differences, and self-segregation — I'm interested to read more about the *government's* explicit policy contributions to segregation in this book.
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In reply to Andrew Linfoot
1mo
Mishti Sharma
@Mishti · 1mo
@andrewlinfoot we're having a community discussion about the book later this month, and you're welcome if you'd like to join in - just email me at ... more
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In reply to David King
1mo
Andrew Linfoot
@andrewlinfoot · 1mo
Just finished it. Definitely would recommend. It feels like a piece of US history that should be required in all high school textbooks but currentl... more
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The Color of Law
The Color of Law
by Richard Rothstein
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David King@dk · 1mo
I haven't read this book yet, but the topic reminds me of a recent blog post called "Dust in the Light" by one of my favorite writers (Ben Thompson): https://stratechery.com/2020/dust-in-the-light/
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